The Medical News

from News-Medical.Net - Latest Medical News and Research from Around the World
  1. Fractures of the clavicle, or collarbone, are common. Unfortunately, current fixation plates that are used to surgically stabilize these fractures are suboptimal, leading to reoperation rates of up to 53%. A new study published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research indicates that custom plates developed through computer modeling may be a better option.
  2. "We are all in this together" became a rallying cry during the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, although a significant portion of the population is not "all in" when it comes to getting vaccinated.
  3. Most everyone understands that a major role of our sense of taste is to inform us when sugar is present in foods and beverages by eliciting sweetness on our tongues. A study led by the Monell Chemical Senses Center, published this month in PLOS ONE, identifies a new human sensory ability to detect sugars in the mouth with a molecular calorie detector, of sorts.
  4. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine used bacteria found on healthy cats to successfully treat a skin infection on mice. These bacteria may serve as the basis for new therapeutics against severe skin infections in humans, dogs and cats.
  5. An international team of researchers, led by scientists at University of California San Diego and Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health, has broadened and deepened understanding of how inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) affect different populations of people and, in the process, have identified new gene variants that may cause the diseases.
  6. Without enzymes, an organism would not be able to survive. It is these biocatalysts that facilitate a whole range of chemical reactions, producing the building blocks of the cells. Enzymes are also used widely in biotechnology and in our households, where they are used in detergents, for example.
  7. An international panel has designed new guidelines to standardize how scientists report research that involves forecasting and prediction of how epidemics of infectious diseases unfold. Simon Pollett of the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Maryland, United States, and colleagues present the guidelines, called EPIFORGE, in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine on October 19th.
  8. During the "first wave" of COVID-19 in the United States, Rajan Chakrabarty, the Harold D. Jolley Career Development Associate Professor at Washington University in St. Louis, learned that African Americans made up 47% of the population in St. Louis, but nearly three quarters of COVID-19 cases.

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20 Οκτωβρίου 2021

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